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“Reality of Nature” at Launch LA

Earlier this month, Richard Glasser, the UN Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Disaster Risk Reduction expressed deep concern about the future of our planet. In his words, “There can be little doubt that 2017 is turning into a year of historic significance in the struggle against climate change. We must realize that these disaster events are […]


“Resplendent Tendencies” Is an Opportunity to Observe an Emerging Artist’s Evolution in Real Time

Makan Negahban is a self-taught, first generation Iranian-American artist who initially gained attention for his portraits in oil. Only until recently did he start experimenting with acrylic on paper. While Negahban’s interest remains rooted in portraiture, his approach has clearly evolved as evidenced in “Resplendent Tendencies,” currently on view at Co-Lab Gallery in Los Angeles. […]

Read | Comments Off on “Resplendent Tendencies” Is an Opportunity to Observe an Emerging Artist’s Evolution in Real Time | Tags: May/June 2017

Tony Pinto Reignites His Practice through “Artist Seen” at Shoebox Projects

Spearheaded by Kristine Schomaker, founder of Shoebox PR and Art and Cake, Shoebox Projects is a month-long residency program for Los Angeles-based artists. Not only does Shoebox Projects give visiting artists a space to work, but it offers the support of a thriving arts community, located at the Brewery Arts Complex, one of the world’s […]

Read | Comments Off on Tony Pinto Reignites His Practice through “Artist Seen” at Shoebox Projects | Tags: April 2017

Why I Continue to Fight

In 2012, I found out that I had breast cancer. To avoid recurrence (since both my mother and grandmother had suffered the same), I opted for a double mastectomy, after which I underwent six rounds of chemo and 18 infusions of Herceptin, a fairly new drug on the market which has had dramatic results for […]

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On Arts Education and Our Current Political Climate

Throughout my youth, my mother dragged me to more museums than I wished to attend. But in doing so, she instilled in me an understanding of art’s capacity to impart change. Works by artists such as Barbara Kruger, Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat didn’t just inform me about pressing issues of the time, but they […]

Read | Comments Off on On Arts Education and Our Current Political Climate | Tags: December 2016

Elizabeth McGrath at Corey Helford Gallery

“It was in the black mirror of Anarchism that Surrealism first recognized itself.” -Andre Breton   The timeliness of Elizabeth McGrath’s exhibition at Corey Helford Gallery strikes a seemingly eerie chord, given our president elect’s invocation of a flawed nostalgia and desire to return to a “better time.” Its title, “Dark Howl,” is a direct […]

Read | Comments Off on Elizabeth McGrath at Corey Helford Gallery | Tags: October/November 2016

Paper’s Pliability Pulsates in “Brand 44 Works on Paper”

Set in the foothills above the City of Glendale, Brand Library and Art Center has been serving music and art lovers across Southern California since 1956. Not only does its library offer more than 110,000 items dedicated exclusively to fine art and music, but its art galleries offer unique programming year-round, including a variety of exhibitions […]


Engaging, Eerie, Odd and Also Beautiful, Erica Rawlings’ New Series Bares Raw Emotion

“Art begins with resistance–at the point where resistance is overcome. No human masterpiece has ever been created without great labor.” – Andre Gide   The life of an artist requires discipline, determination, and the willingness to fail. More so, it requires a level of perseverance that can become increasingly difficult to sustain when life itself […]


Equal Representation for All

Spearheaded by Los Angeles based painter David Spanbock, BLAM debuted its first show, “Concrete,” at their Los Angeles exhibition space on Saturday, April 16. A bicoastal artist collective created for the purpose of establishing an invigorating synergy between two very diverse yet thriving art scenes, BLAM’s mission is to showcase works by emerging and mid-career […]

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Relinquishing Control and Embracing Discovery

“When we were children, we used to think that when we were grown-up we would no longer be vulnerable. But to grow up is to accept vulnerability…. To be alive is to be vulnerable.” ― Madeleine L’Engle Nurit Avesar’s solo exhibition, “Elemental Energies,” exemplifies the power that creativity can impart when the artist is willing […]

Read | Comments Off on Relinquishing Control and Embracing Discovery | Tags: March 2016

The Clash of Nature and the Human Imprint in “Farewell, Eden”

During the 19th century, landscape painting was a popular form of expression for artists to celebrate mankind’s dominion over nature. Pastoral scenes of manicured lawns, tamed gardens and ripe harvests depicted a peaceful, almost perfect world where man and nature thrived in harmonious union. Currently on view at Descanso Garden’s Sturt Haaga Gallery, “Farewell, Eden” […]

Read | Comments Off on The Clash of Nature and the Human Imprint in “Farewell, Eden” | Tags: February 2016

Art’s Power to Overcome Adversity Resounds in “Watts”

In the summer of 1965, a young black man was pulled over by a white police officer for suspicion of driving while under the influence. The incident occurred on August 11 on the outskirts of Watts and brought with it an unsettling exchange. What initially began as a roadside argument quickly escalated into a fight, […]

Read | Comments Off on Art’s Power to Overcome Adversity Resounds in “Watts” | Tags: January 2016

Dani Dodge Explores the Intrusion of Fear on the Home Space in “Peeled & Raw”

“Neither a man nor a crowd nor a nation can be trusted to act humanely or to think sanely under the influence of a great fear.” – Bertrand Russell Los Angeles-based artist Dani Dodge has paid witness to more than her share of devastation. A former journalist and war correspondent, Dodge was embedded with the 1st […]

Read | Comments Off on Dani Dodge Explores the Intrusion of Fear on the Home Space in “Peeled & Raw” | Tags: December 2015

Charles Garabedian Evokes the Power of Myth in “Sacrifice of the Fleet” at L.A. Louver

Charles Garabedian has long embodied a non-conformist approach to his practice. The “Bad” Painting movement of the late 1970’s is perhaps the only definitive genre with which he’s been aptly associated. While his elusive style has made it difficult to tabulate his work into any particular category, the one consistency that recurs throughout much of […]

Read | Comments Off on Charles Garabedian Evokes the Power of Myth in “Sacrifice of the Fleet” at L.A. Louver | Tags: November 2015

Randy Hage’s Lost but not Forgotten Storefronts

Los Angeles-based artist Randy Hage has been photographing New York City storefronts for nearly 20 years. Since the late 1990s, he’s amassed more than 700 photos from which he’s sourced the subject matter for his amazingly detailed photorealistic sculptures that depict mom & pop establishments, each of which retains an iconic symbolism representative of generations […]

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Hard-Edged: Geometrical Abstraction and Beyond: An Important Show Featuring Works by Artists of African Descent Who Look to Abstraction as a Vehicle for Expression

It’s difficult to believe that our country’s canonized definition of art history continues to lack a comprehensive representation of the various contributions that African American artists have made to abstract painting. Yet, to this day, most anthologized collections claiming to comprise complete collections of contemporary art history still fail to feature more than a handful […]

Read | Comments Off on Hard-Edged: Geometrical Abstraction and Beyond: An Important Show Featuring Works by Artists of African Descent Who Look to Abstraction as a Vehicle for Expression | Tags: October 2015

Justin Van Hoy’s Legacy Lives on at Slow Culture

Shortly after the release of Justin Van Hoy’s 2012 curatorial publication Milk & Honey: Contemporary Art in California, his life came to an untimely end. At just 31, the accomplished artist lost what had been his second battle with cancer. While Van Hoy had found success at a relatively early age due to his prodigious […]

Read | Comments Off on Justin Van Hoy’s Legacy Lives on at Slow Culture | Tags: September 2015

Jennifer Gunlock Continues to Communicate the Complexities of Ecological Imbalance through Her Practice

Los-Angeles based artist Jennifer Gunlock has often looked to nature for inspiration. While her work seems abstractionist, it also embodies elements that link her to surrealism: Gunlock has an uncanny ability to interweave elements of the urban world with tree-like formations that, together, produce futuristic landscapes. Intrigued by the camouflaged cell phone tower, poorly fashioned after […]

Read | Comments Off on Jennifer Gunlock Continues to Communicate the Complexities of Ecological Imbalance through Her Practice | Tags: September 2015

Kohn Gallery Celebrates Thirty Years with The West Coast Avant-Garde: 1950’s – Present

In 1965, the Los Angeles Contemporary Museum of Art first opened its doors on Wilshire Boulevard. Before LACMA, Los Angeles lacked any semblance of an alternative art hub. It was this absence, however, that made way for a new generation of artists who embraced the city as unique platform from which they could indulge in […]

Read | Comments Off on Kohn Gallery Celebrates Thirty Years with The West Coast Avant-Garde: 1950’s – Present | Tags: Summer 2015

A.L. Steiner, Anthony Burdin, and Drew Heitzler at Blum & Poe

Three new solo-exhibitions featuring works by A.L. Steiner, Anthony Burdin, and Drew Heitzler are currently on view at Blum & Poe in Los Angeles. A.L. Steiner’s first solo-exhibition with the gallery, Come & Go, features works that span the last twenty years of the artist’s career and includes what Roberta Smith of The New York […]

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Gagosian Gallery’s New Los Angeles Show Urges Us to Remember

While we pursue more information than we did in the past, we have become less apt to retain most of which we learn because of our ever-present access to the Internet. This is because most every word and image has been documented digitally and can be found online in what is now the world’s largest […]

Read | Comments Off on Gagosian Gallery’s New Los Angeles Show Urges Us to Remember | Tags: Summer 2015

Deborah Martin’s Newest Series Continues to Illuminate the Uncanny in America’s Outback

Walt Whitman wrote in the preface to the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, “The proof of a poet is that his country absorbs him as affectionately as he has absorbed it.” This theme manifests throughout the work of Deborah Martin, a contemporary realist landscape painter who conveys the essence inherent within marginalized communities that […]

Read | Comments Off on Deborah Martin’s Newest Series Continues to Illuminate the Uncanny in America’s Outback | Tags: June 2015

Echo Lew’s New Works Reflect a Life Based in Aesthetics as Much as Utility

After working with traditional mediums for nearly twenty-eight years, Los Angeles based artist Echo Lew grew curious about the effects of light in motion and began experimenting with photography. Not only did this investigation lead him “to spontaneously tap into decades of drawing experience while the camera’s shutter was open,” as conveyed by Lew himself, but it […]

Read | Comments Off on Echo Lew’s New Works Reflect a Life Based in Aesthetics as Much as Utility | Tags: May 2015

Sonja Schenk Reinterprets Landscape in “Hovenweep”

It makes sense that Sonja Schenk’s latest body of work provides a perspective that only a few would even consider. Absent of a horizon line, the improvised landscapes that comprise Schenk’s solo exhibition, Hovenweep,provide an elevated point of view that few rarely if ever have the opportunity to glimpse. The Los Angeles based artist’s newest […]

Read | Comments Off on Sonja Schenk Reinterprets Landscape in “Hovenweep” | Tags: May 2015

Anthony Caro: Works from the 1960s Stimulates the Senses and Invigorates the Intellect

Now on view at Gagosian Beverly Hills is a select collection of fourteen early works by one of Britain’s most influential practitioners of modern sculpture, the late Sir Anthony Caro. Not only does the gallery’s abundance of natural light beautifully illuminate the artist’s early works, but its truly expansive and open floor plan allow viewers […]

Read | Comments Off on Anthony Caro: Works from the 1960s Stimulates the Senses and Invigorates the Intellect | Tags: April 2015