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Kit-Bashing and Assembling Political Art: Glenn Kaino: A Shout within a Storm at The Contemporary Arts Center, November 17, 2017-April 22, 2018

One of the least sculptural of the wondrous works at the mid-career retrospective of sculptor Glenn Kaino’s work at the Contemporary Arts Center is a two-dimensional graphic that looks like an ancient map that has been housed in an archive with a leaky roof. Shapes and outlines are beautiful but discontinuous; areas that might represent […]


Men Looking: “Albrecht Durer: The Age of Reformation and Renaissance” Cincinnati Art Museum, November 17-February 11, 2018

The Reformation had its 500th anniversary this year. A movement that changed the ways Europeans read, worshipped, traded, and slaughtered each other, it also had the potential to change the nature of art. In part, this is because the various Protestant churches that sought to reform the Catholic hegemony tended, among other things, to take […]

Read | Comments Off on Men Looking: “Albrecht Durer: The Age of Reformation and Renaissance” Cincinnati Art Museum, November 17-February 11, 2018 | Tags: * · December 2017

Framing the Air: “Cole Carothers: 40 Years & New Works” at Caza Sikes, November 3-27, 2017

As you walk into Caza Sikes in Oakley to see the ambitious mini-retrospective of Cole Carothers’s paintings, you are greeted by a large scale self-portrait called “Livestrong” (2005). In it, he is standing in what for many of his paintings is his home away from home, the corner of his studio. It is brashly hung—it […]

Read | Comments Off on Framing the Air: “Cole Carothers: 40 Years & New Works” at Caza Sikes, November 3-27, 2017 | Tags: * · November 2017

When Size Matters: “Small Paintings from the Taft Collection,” Taft Museum of Art, July 14-November 5, 2017

  In the Music Room at the Taft, all of the paintings are grand. A few are truly monumental. In the Taft’s Sinton Room right now is an exhibition of another sort of painting, eight of them in all, the largest dimension of which is just a hair over a foot and a half tall. […]

Read | Comments Off on When Size Matters: “Small Paintings from the Taft Collection,” Taft Museum of Art, July 14-November 5, 2017 | Tags: * · October 2017

Visualizing Natural History: “Wild About Wildflowers,” Lloyd Library and Museum, September 9-November 18, 2017

Though the show is titled “Wild About Wildflowers,” the Lloyd’s current show is constrained in many ways. It is a truly small exhibit, taking up little more than a half dozen standing cases, though it is also an absorbing show: there was a guy who was there when I arrived still looking at things when […]

Read | Comments Off on Visualizing Natural History: “Wild About Wildflowers,” Lloyd Library and Museum, September 9-November 18, 2017 | Tags: October 2017

The Pushcart of Ideas: A Conversation with Danny Brown

Aeqai’s Editor-in-Chief, Daniel Brown, recently received a Lifetime Achievement award from Marquis Who’s Who, which has been recognizing American accomplishments in a variety of fields since 1899. I sat down with Danny earlier this month and we talked informally about his perspective on the art world and some of the various roles he has had […]


The Place of the Nude: “9th Annual NUDE: Exploring the Uncovered Human Form,” Manifest, August 17-September 15, 2017

A show about the nude can’t help but raise issues about voyeurism any more than it can help raise questions about sexual politics. (I counted, for example, only four representations of the male nude to nearly twenty female.) This is the Manifest Gallery’s ninth show featuring the naked body, and I would have liked to […]


When Landscape was Real Estate: “A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America,” Cincinnati Art Museum June 10-September 3, 2017

  A careful visitor to the Cincinnati Art Museum’s very substantial exhibition of paintings, sculptures, furniture, documents, implements, and advertisements of many sorts might well leave with no clearer idea about what constitutes “folk art” than when he or she came in. What, exactly, are we looking at? We’re not even sure what to call […]

Read | Comments Off on When Landscape was Real Estate: “A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America,” Cincinnati Art Museum June 10-September 3, 2017 | Tags: * · July/August 2017

Kingdoms and Horses: “Treasures of British Painting 1400-2000: The Berger Collection,” Taft Museum of Art June 10-October 1, 2017

One doesn’t immediately think of the British for their heritage of great painting. As Britain rose as a great mercantile power starting in the 16th century, it had to import painters, typically from Northern Europe, to their isolated island. For two hundred years, those foreigners largely defined English visual accomplishments and taste. British portraiture never […]

Read | Comments Off on Kingdoms and Horses: “Treasures of British Painting 1400-2000: The Berger Collection,” Taft Museum of Art June 10-October 1, 2017 | Tags: * · July/August 2017

Half an Index: “Signature Scheurer: A Retrospective of the Works of Michael Scheurer” at the Alice F. and Harris K. Weston Art Gallery, April 28-June 18, 2017

Sometime in the 1980s, Michael Scheurer came across an Italian toy called a Puncherino. A Puncherino is a little like what in my neighborhood we called a BoLo, a toy for one which had a lightweight wooden paddle with a rubber ball attached by an elastic cord (always the first thing to break). The difference, […]

Read | Comments Off on Half an Index: “Signature Scheurer: A Retrospective of the Works of Michael Scheurer” at the Alice F. and Harris K. Weston Art Gallery, April 28-June 18, 2017 | Tags: * · May/June 2017

Got to Draw: “Drawn: 4th Annual International Exhibition of Contemporary Drawing” at Manifest Gallery, April 21-May 19, 2017

As you work your way through the drawings on view in the pleasant warren of rooms at Manifest Gallery, something wonderful happens when you reach Lucas Bianchi’s “Self Portrait in Studio” (2016). The energy of Bianchi’s drawing is everywhere in evidence, and it tells you this is a young man mad about drawing. We’ve interrupted […]

Read | Comments Off on Got to Draw: “Drawn: 4th Annual International Exhibition of Contemporary Drawing” at Manifest Gallery, April 21-May 19, 2017 | Tags: * · April 2017

Faith and Family: “Rembrandt and the Jews: The Berger Print Collection” at the Skirball Museum, Hebrew Union College, March 5-April 30, 2017

Rembrandt’s apparently substantial interest in things Jewish has been matched by western culture’s interest in Rembrandt’s interest in things Jewish. This has led to a range of misconceptions over the last century and a half: for example, he was Jewish (he wasn’t), or that he sought out Jewish models because they had individuality and character […]

Read | Comments Off on Faith and Family: “Rembrandt and the Jews: The Berger Print Collection” at the Skirball Museum, Hebrew Union College, March 5-April 30, 2017 | Tags: March 2017

Feeling History: “The Poetry of Place” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, December 10, 2016-June 11, 2017

“The Poetry of Place” is a small show at the Cincinnati Art Museum, with only 18 photographs by only three artists, William Clift, Michael Kenna, and Linda Connor, the works all selected from the Museum’s permanent collection and organized by Curatorial Assistant of Photography Emily Bauman. In recent years, there have been some outstanding museum […]

Read | Comments Off on Feeling History: “The Poetry of Place” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, December 10, 2016-June 11, 2017 | Tags: * · January/February 2017

The Dappled Life: “Van Gogh: Into the Undergrowth” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, October 15, 2016-January 8, 2017

Okay, I’ll go first. In my decades of getting to know and love the Cincinnati Art Museum’s permanent collection, I had never really liked Van Gogh’s “Into the Undergrowth,” painted a month or so before he died in 1890 at the end of a whirlwind career that lasted no longer than ten years. “Into the […]

Read | Comments Off on The Dappled Life: “Van Gogh: Into the Undergrowth” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, October 15, 2016-January 8, 2017 | Tags: * · December 2016

The Big Chill: “Roe Ethridge: Nearest Neighbor” at the Contemporary Arts Center, October 7, 2016-March 12, 2017

My place to start thinking about Roe Ethridge’s work and sensibility is his “Thanksgiving 1984 (table)” (2009). It captures the artist’s love of surface, an almost obsessive attention to the glimmering outsides of things unmatched, in some ways, since baroque and rococo paintings of the 17th and 18th centuries. The picture sees it all: Thanksgiving’s […]

Read | Comments Off on The Big Chill: “Roe Ethridge: Nearest Neighbor” at the Contemporary Arts Center, October 7, 2016-March 12, 2017 | Tags: December 2016

Decentering the Art: “Kentucky Renaissance: The Lexington Camera Club and Its Community, 1954-1974” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, October 8, 2016-January 1, 2017

In an undated and untitled photograph by Robert C. May, we are standing at the edge of some unremarkable woods, separated by a paved road from more woods on the other side. The view is dominated by four scruffy trees, no two of which are standing at quite the same angle. The road is as […]

Read | Comments Off on Decentering the Art: “Kentucky Renaissance: The Lexington Camera Club and Its Community, 1954-1974” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, October 8, 2016-January 1, 2017 | Tags: * · October/November 2016

Undocumenting the Document: An Interview with Kevin Moore

Kevin Moore, an Independent curator and writer based in New York, has been the Artistic Director and Curator for FotoFocus since 2013. He earned his PhD in Art History at Princeton and has worked as a curator at Harvard’s Fogg Art Museum. He has written books about Lartigue and color photography in America (in conjunction […]

Read | Comments Off on Undocumenting the Document: An Interview with Kevin Moore | Tags: * · Early Fall 2016

Good Night, Bloom: “A Photographic Survey of the American Yard: Photographs by Joshua White” at the Third Floor Gallery in the Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, September 22-October 29, 2016

Emerson’s idea of how to see Nature was to look up; Thoreau’s idea of how to see Nature was to look down. It drove Emerson crazy. Instead of becoming a great Transcendalist thinker, Thoreau, to Emerson’s mind, went huckleberrying. While Emerson sought to capture the Universal Soul in Nature, Thoreau bent over and watched red […]

Read | Comments Off on Good Night, Bloom: “A Photographic Survey of the American Yard: Photographs by Joshua White” at the Third Floor Gallery in the Fine Arts Center, Northern Kentucky University, September 22-October 29, 2016 | Tags: Early Fall 2016

“Everything But the Meaning”: A Review of Joel Meyerowitz, Seeing Things: A Kid’s Guide to Looking at Photographs (New York: Aperture, 2016)

In the past 35 or so years, Joel Meyerowitz has seen more than a dozen monographs of his photographs published, and has contributed pictures and text to others. He has become known by now, more or less successively, as a street photographer (one of the earliest to have worked extensively in color), a landscape photographer, […]

Read | Comments Off on “Everything But the Meaning”: A Review of Joel Meyerowitz, Seeing Things: A Kid’s Guide to Looking at Photographs (New York: Aperture, 2016) | Tags: * · Summer 2016

Maps and Stars: “Not in New York: Carl Solway and Cincinnati” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, April 30-October 30, 2016

Carl Solway (and family) have been so deeply entwined with the art gallery scene in Cincinnati that it takes a timeline on the wall to keep it all straight. He graduated from Walnut Hills in 1952; ten years later, he opened Flair Gallery at Fifth and Race. Ten years after that, he had two galleries […]

Read | Comments Off on Maps and Stars: “Not in New York: Carl Solway and Cincinnati” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, April 30-October 30, 2016 | Tags: * · May 2016

The Bedroom and the Keyhole: “Van Gogh’s Bedrooms” at the Art Institute of Chicago

If your appetite for Van Gogh was whetted by the five wonderful canvases shown at the Taft Museum’s current “Impressions of Landscape,” you should promptly schedule a road trip to Chicago where the Art Institute is showing “Van Gogh’s Bedrooms,” an exhibition designed to contextualize the three different versions Van Gogh painted of “The Bedroom” […]

Read | Comments Off on The Bedroom and the Keyhole: “Van Gogh’s Bedrooms” at the Art Institute of Chicago | Tags: April 2016

Provocative Things: A Profile and Interview with Jo Ann Callis

In the early 1970s, Jo Ann Callis left Cincinnati, where she had grown up, for California. Some forty years later, FotoFocus brought her back. On February 24, 2016, she gave a lecture—really an annotated slide show of her work—at the Cincinnati Art Museum as part of its Lecture and Visiting Artist Series, and the following […]

Read | Comments Off on Provocative Things: A Profile and Interview with Jo Ann Callis | Tags: * · March 2016

Pieces of the Whole: 20 x 20 x 20: Celebrating 20 Years of the Weston Art Gallery and the Aronoff Center for the Arts, January 29-March 27, 2016

Artists have career, or even mid-career, retrospectives; galleries, less frequently. Many galleries don’t last as long as a successful artist’s career; fewer still have something that needs to be said or demonstrated about their having arrived at two or three or more decades. The Alice F. and Harris K. Weston Gallery, having successfully shown work […]

Read | Comments Off on Pieces of the Whole: 20 x 20 x 20: Celebrating 20 Years of the Weston Art Gallery and the Aronoff Center for the Arts, January 29-March 27, 2016 | Tags: March 2016

On the Verge: Daubigny, Monet, Van Gogh: Impressions of Landscape at Taft Museum of Art, February 20-May 29, 2016

How newly-founded must an American art museum be not to be awash in paintings by the painters of the Barbizon School, either on display or, perhaps more likely these days, in storage? The works of Corot, Rousseau, Millet, Daubigny, and a number of artists loosely allied with them represent an important but frequently not fully […]

Read | Comments Off on On the Verge: Daubigny, Monet, Van Gogh: Impressions of Landscape at Taft Museum of Art, February 20-May 29, 2016 | Tags: * · February 2016

Overwhelming Landscape: Jonathan Queen & Matthew Metzger at Miller Gallery, January 7-February 6, 2016

In the artist’s statement accompanying Matthew Metzger’s showing of ten new paintings at Miller Gallery, Metzger articulately lays out some of his goals: “In an overwhelming landscape, harsh, indifferent, opposite to arguably our most endearing human traits, we recognize our humanness.” In a nutshell, Metzger is here describing our relationship to the sublime, an aesthetic […]

Read | Comments Off on Overwhelming Landscape: Jonathan Queen & Matthew Metzger at Miller Gallery, January 7-February 6, 2016 | Tags: * · January 2016

Past Perfect: “Mapplethorpe + 25: A Symposium to Commemorate the 25th Anniversary of The Perfect Moment” at the Contemporary Arts Center, October 23-24, 2015

It was a pretty perfect moment. For one evening and the whole day following, FotoFocus and the Contemporary Arts Center teamed up to sponsor and host three panel discussions and three keynote speakers to talk about the making of Mapplethorpe the artist, the making of the CAC’s 1990 show “The Perfect Moment” and subsequent trial, […]

Read | Comments Off on Past Perfect: “Mapplethorpe + 25: A Symposium to Commemorate the 25th Anniversary of The Perfect Moment” at the Contemporary Arts Center, October 23-24, 2015 | Tags: * · November 2015

The Dog, the Unicorn, and the Wheel: “Sublime Beauty: Raphael’s ‘Portrait of a Lady with a Unicorn’” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, October 3, 2015-January 3, 2016

First of all, forget the unicorn. Or at the very least, hold it in abeyance. X-ray analysis of the painting shows us that before there was a unicorn on this young woman’s lap, there used to be a dog. And before skilled restoration turned it back into a unicorn again in the early 20th century, […]

Read | Comments Off on The Dog, the Unicorn, and the Wheel: “Sublime Beauty: Raphael’s ‘Portrait of a Lady with a Unicorn’” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, October 3, 2015-January 3, 2016 | Tags: * · October 2015

The Nothing that is There: “Stewart Goldman: Nuances” at the Philip M. Meyers, Jr., Memorial Gallery, DAAP, September 13-October 25, 2015

It’s fair to wonder on what basis we can be sure that the wonderful series of recent paintings by Stewart Goldman, curated by Aaron Cowan, are landscapes. Many are horizontal—some even lusciously elongated—but not all. The artist has provided a number of keys to help us see the landscape elements that inspired these mostly non-representational […]


Both Sides Now: “Northern Baroque Splendor: The HOHENBUCHAU COLLECTION from LIECHTENSTEIN. The Princely Collections” at the Cincinnati Art Museum

Jan Tilens and Hendrick van Balen’s “Expansive Mountain Valley Landscape with a Rainbow and the Hunt of Diana” is a classic example of a “Weltlandschaft,” or world landscape, the sort of picture that first drew Otto Christian Fassbender and his wife Renate to assemble their outstanding collection of 17th century paintings now on view at […]

Read | Comments Off on Both Sides Now: “Northern Baroque Splendor: The HOHENBUCHAU COLLECTION from LIECHTENSTEIN. The Princely Collections” at the Cincinnati Art Museum | Tags: * · Summer 2015

A River Runs Between: “American Impressionism: The Lure of the Artists’ Colony” at the Dayton Art Institute, March 7, 2015-May 31, 2015

Frank Benson, an artist probably best known today for an oeuvre of duck hunting etchings that are, oddly, both academic and commercial, self-identified enthusiastically as an Impressionist: “I follow the light, where it comes from and where it goes.” The Dayton Art Institute is hosting an exhibit of more than a hundred paintings from the […]

Read | Comments Off on A River Runs Between: “American Impressionism: The Lure of the Artists’ Colony” at the Dayton Art Institute, March 7, 2015-May 31, 2015 | Tags: May 2015

The Idler and the Crowd: “Wild West to Gilded Age: American Treasures from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art” at the Taft Museum of Art, February 6, 2015-May 24, 2015

If you had wanted an education in the transition from the 19th to the 20th centuries in American culture, the Taft Museum has been the place to be. In the past year and a half, the Taft has hosted the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art’s collection of American daguerreotypes, “Telling Tales” from the New-York Historical Society, […]

Read | Comments Off on The Idler and the Crowd: “Wild West to Gilded Age: American Treasures from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art” at the Taft Museum of Art, February 6, 2015-May 24, 2015 | Tags: * · March 2015

Looking Where the Focus Isn’t: A Profile of Brian Sholis

Brian Sholis, the new Associate Curator of Photography at the Cincinnati Art Museum, says from the start that he has no training—“none at all”—in Art History. He sees himself as “a contemporary art person who zeroed in on photography,” as he explained in an interview with Aeqai earlier this year. His undergraduate degree was in […]

Read | Comments Off on Looking Where the Focus Isn’t: A Profile of Brian Sholis | Tags: * · December 2014

Modernist Directions and Misdirections: “Paris Night & Day: Masterworks of Photography from Atget to Man Ray” at the Taft Museum of Art, October 3, 2014-January 11, 2015

The art historical narratives of the history of photography and the advent of modernism are often intertwined, though in some of those narratives, photography helps facilitate modernism, and in others, modernism gives photography the nudge it needs to outgrow its 19th century roots. As the captions on one of the walls at the Taft note, […]

Read | Comments Off on Modernist Directions and Misdirections: “Paris Night & Day: Masterworks of Photography from Atget to Man Ray” at the Taft Museum of Art, October 3, 2014-January 11, 2015 | Tags: * · November 2014

Systems of Watching: “Eyes on the Street” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, October 11, 2014-January 4, 2015

Street photography was a movement initially made possible by cameras that were small, film that was fast, and hands that were steady. It refreshed photography as an art form by opening up an almost unlimited source of unscripted narrative. It required some skills of the photographer not unlike those needed by an undercover cop: you […]

Read | Comments Off on Systems of Watching: “Eyes on the Street” at the Cincinnati Art Museum, October 11, 2014-January 4, 2015 | Tags: * · October 2014

The Messy Democracy of Photography: An Interview with FotoFocus’s Kevin Moore and Mary Ellen Goeke

1989 was a watershed year for the art of photography in Cincinnati. Kristin Spangenberg published her catalogue Photographic Treasures from the Cincinnati Art Museum, which recorded the results of her having been given funding to purchase one hundred photographs to give the Museum’s existing but scattershot photographic holdings some shape and a sure anchor in […]

Read | Comments Off on The Messy Democracy of Photography: An Interview with FotoFocus’s Kevin Moore and Mary Ellen Goeke | Tags: * · September 2014

Turning the Leaf: America’s Eden: Thomas Cole and “The Voyage of Life”

by Jonathan Kamholtz Taft Musuem of Art, June 13, 2014-September 14, 2014 There is plenty of spiritual energy in the great landscape paintings of 19th century America, but it is usually Emersonian in nature–Christian by implication and default rather than intention. That spirit is sometimes dreamy and solitary, and sometimes busy with life and labor. […]

Read | Comments Off on Turning the Leaf: America’s Eden: Thomas Cole and “The Voyage of Life” | Tags: * · June 2014 · On View

Drawing, Drawing, Drawn: Drawn at Manifest Gallery

by Jonathan Kamholtz April 8, 2014-May 16, 2014 Joomi Chung’s “Atlas 4” (2011) is an acetate scroll of indeterminate length, standing like an elephantine roll of film on one of its edges, allowing us to scrutinize some of its intricate webs of markings. It has been covered with networks of (mostly) black ink, some of […]

Read | Comments Off on Drawing, Drawing, Drawn: Drawn at Manifest Gallery | Tags: * · May 2014 · On View

Death and Taxa: Isabella Kirkland: Stilled Life

by Jonathan Kamholtz Dayton Art Institute February 22, 2014-May 18, 2014 Many years ago, I saw a group of photographs of tulips in bloom, pulled out of the ground, dirt still clinging to the bulbs and roots, captured after they had been laid out horizontally on a table. They were part of a group show […]

Read | 1 Comment | Tags: * · April 2014 · On View

Love for Sale: Genius and Grace: Francois Boucher and the Generation of 1700

by Jonathan Kamholtz Cincinnati Art Museum February 14, 2014-May 11, 2014 In Jean Restout’s “Pygmalion and Galatea,” the statue of Galatea, newly come to life, spreads her arms and bares her breasts to the adoring sculptor. She seems less surprised at her new incarnation than he does; he gazes at him with a sophisticated, impish […]

Read | Comments Off on Love for Sale: Genius and Grace: Francois Boucher and the Generation of 1700 | Tags: * · March 2014 · On View

Glass Houses: Rob Anderson’s “A Place in Time” at the Hiestand Gallery, Miami University

by Jonathan Kamholtz December 12, 2013-February 3, 2014 If you look to your left when you walk into Miami University’s cozy Hiestand Gallery, you’ll see “Lucy” (2013), a statuesque portrait of a standing baby. She is turning away from us, pleasurably but implacably following some agenda of her own. She could be a guardian figure […]

Read | 1 Comment | Tags: * · January 2014 · On View

Iconoclast’s Dilemma: Object of Devotion: Medieval English Alabaster Sculpture from the Victoria and Albert Museum

Iconoclast’s Dilemma: Object of Devotion: Medieval English Alabaster Sculpture from the Victoria and Albert Museum Dayton Art Institute
October 26, 2013-January 5, 2014 By Jonathan Kamholtz In “Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem,” sculpted in alabaster in England sometime between 1450 and 1470, eight carved figures, full or fully suggested, greet Christ as he arrives on his donkey. […]

Read | Comments Off on Iconoclast’s Dilemma: Object of Devotion: Medieval English Alabaster Sculpture from the Victoria and Albert Museum | Tags: * · December 2013

Deconstructing America: Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19-Century American Art

Deconstructing America: Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19-Century American Art Taft Museum of Art
September 20, 2013-January 12, 2014 By Jonathan Kamholtz “Telling Tales” at the Taft makes its case for American art the hard way.  This excellent loan exhibit from the New-York Historical Society surveys American painting with very few of the go-to works […]

Read | Comments Off on Deconstructing America: Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19-Century American Art | Tags: * · October 2013

Singing for Myself: Seeing Opera

Singing for Myself: Seeing Opera Alice F. and Harris K. Weston Art Gallery
June 14–August 31, 2013 By Jonathan Kamholtz Mr. Sousaphone, the main character in Jay Bolotin’s remarkable 22-minute video “Kharmen,” makes it back home after a long and dangerous and partly hallucinatory urban trek. He puts an old vinyl—or possible even shellac—version of Carmen […]

Read | Comments Off on Singing for Myself: Seeing Opera | Tags: * · July-August 2013

Pictures and Property: Photographic Wonders: 
American Daguerreotypes from The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Pictures and Property:   Photographic Wonders:
  American Daguerreotypes from The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art May 17–August 25, 2013 By Jonathan Kamholtz “Photographic Wonders,” a selection of daguerreotypes culled from the extraordinary collection put together by Hallmark and then given in 2005 to Kansas City’s Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, is the real deal. In the ten […]

Read | Comments Off on Pictures and Property: Photographic Wonders: 
American Daguerreotypes from The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art | Tags: * · June 2013

Gazes and Shadows: Continuity and Change: The Return to Figurative Painting

Gazes and Shadows: Continuity and Change: The Return to Figurative Painting Cincinnati Art Galleries, May 3–June 8 By Jonathan Kamholtz “Continuity and Change” is a big and ambitious show, curated by Daniel Brown, the Editor of Aeqai who has written about art, been an art dealer, and an independent curator for several decades. The show […]

Read | 1 Comment | Tags: * · May 2013

The Pits: Empire Falling: New Photographs by Elena Dorfman

The Pits: Empire Falling: New Photographs by Elena Dorfman Phyllis Weston Gallery, March 29-May 11 By Jonathan Kamholtz From a distance, “Empire Falling #6” (the artist’s titles are not very helpful as aide-memoires or to help us focus on the picture’s issues) might be a colorized photograph taken by a long-gone intrepid nineteenth century archeological […]

Read | Comments Off on The Pits: Empire Falling: New Photographs by Elena Dorfman | Tags: * · April 2013

“The River Having A Strong Flow”: Storm—Watershed—Riverbank

“The River Having A Strong Flow”:  Storm—Watershed—Riverbank The 1913 Flood Dayton Art Institute, February 23-May 5, 2013 By Jonathan Kamholtz Associate Curator Jane A. Black has curated a trio of shows to commemorate the centennial of the flood of the Great Miami River. In March 1913, following a series of wet winter storms, the river […]

Read | Comments Off on “The River Having A Strong Flow”: Storm—Watershed—Riverbank | Tags: * · March 2013

Greg Storer at La Poste Eatery

Greg Storer at La Poste Eatery by Jonathan Kamholtz As you walk into the space where Greg Storer’s paintings are hanging, to your left are two small pictures of cars parked at a drive-in, their screens towering above mostly empty landscapes. One painting features a scene from The Godfather (1972) (“And That Day May Never Come”), […]

Read | 1 Comment | Tags: * · February 2013

Rituals and Enactments: The Self-Portraits of Anne Arden McDonald

Rituals and Enactments: The Self-Portraits of Anne Arden McDonald October 15, 2012 through February 22, 2013 Iris BookCafe and Gallery ~ Jonathan Kamholtz In Anne Arden McDonald’s “Self-Portrait #20, Utah, 1989” (her titles are generally not helpful or revealing), the artist depicts herself on her knees with a semicircle of lit candles in front of […]

Read | Comments Off on Rituals and Enactments: The Self-Portraits of Anne Arden McDonald | Tags: * · January 2013

Landscapes of the Mind: Metaphor, Archetype, and Symbol: 1971-2012

Landscapes of the Mind:  Metaphor, Archetype, and Symbol: 1971-2012 October 5, 2012 through January 10, 2013 YWCA Women’s Art Gallery By Jonathan Kamholtz In Jane Alden Stevens’s “Windbreak Netting,” a mesh curtain hangs between us and the apples growing on a tree in Aomori Prefecture, Japan. The curtain protects the apples, but also serves to […]

Read | Comments Off on Landscapes of the Mind: Metaphor, Archetype, and Symbol: 1971-2012 | Tags: * · December 2012

Cole Carothers’s Outdoor and Indoor Light

Cole Carothers’s Outdoor and Indoor Light By Jonathan Kamholtz If you go to “Building Sight(s),” Cole Carothers’s new exhibit at the 5Th Street Gallery, looking forward to seeing works in the artist’s traditional look, you may be disappointed. For more than three decades, Carothers has produced paintings that explore the continuities and discontinuities of space. Built […]


Going Baroque: Guercino’s “Mars with Cupid” (1649) at the CAM

Editor’s Note:  Aeqai is pleased to announce to our readers that long-time critic and collector Jon Kamholtz has joined aeqai as a regular critic.  Kamholtz teaches in the English Deparment at The University of Cincinnati, and begins with our September issue by selecting a painting from the permanent collection of the  Cincinnati Art Museum for […]

Read | Comments Off on Going Baroque: Guercino’s “Mars with Cupid” (1649) at the CAM | Tags: * · Digest · September 2012