May 2020

The Places You’ll Go: The Art of Walking

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in *, May 2020

The Places You’ll Go: The Art of Walking

During this time of the pandemic, in addition to reading, what I have been doing a lot of is walking. Every day, sometimes going two or even three times, just for the purpose of getting out of the house, getting some space to think or reflect. A change of scenery at a slow pace. An […]

Another Online Visit: A Blue Thought in a Blue Shade: Anna Atkins and Cyanotype Photograms

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in *, May 2020

Another Online Visit: A Blue Thought in a Blue Shade: Anna Atkins and Cyanotype Photograms

A few years ago, way back when art could still be encountered in person, Emily Bauman, Photography Curatorial Assistant at the CAM, wrote an online note about the experience of being able to handle and see up close a cyanotype by Anna Atkins, the figure who is generally credited with being the first woman photographer […]

Art Acquisitions

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in *, May 2020

Art Acquisitions

What goes into acquiring art institutionally?  Aeqai takes a look at the Cincinnati Art Museum and the Skirball Museum at Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion. Cynthia Amneus, curator, fashion arts and textiles at CAM, is an expert in acquisitions which can be gifts or purchases.  Sometimes, a curator will receive a call […]

Celebrating the Modern Woman: Isabel Bishop 1902-1988

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

Celebrating the Modern Woman: Isabel Bishop 1902-1988

Isabel Bishop, born in Cincinnati, Ohio, spent her childhood in Detroit, before moving to New York City to study illustration at the New York School of Applied Design for Women.  For many years she had a studio on Union Square at 14th Street, and the Square inspired Bishop with much human activity, which often became […]

Carolee Schneemann (1939-2019)

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

Carolee Schneemann (1939-2019)

I was asked to write this article on one of my favorite women artists. Without hesitation, I knew it would be about the late, great Carolee Schneemann. Carolee activated the female nude with a multidisciplinary practice that spanned sixty years including painting, assemblage, performance and film. She received her B.A. in poetry and philosophy from […]

Fotofolio – Lisa Britton

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

Fotofolio - Lisa Britton

“Lisa Britton Retrospective: 1988-1999” Lisa’s statement and bio: What causes one to be truly amazed and delighted? For me it is light itself, and how it can reveal a vision of loveliness and meaning. In all of these images light reveals an idea, a dream, a landscape, a moment which felt sacred in some way. […]

Tala Madani and her Théâtre de la Cruauté in Projections

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

Tala Madani and her Théâtre de la Cruauté in Projections

At a whopping eight feet wide and predominately a Mars Black that tempers into the Payne’s Gray realm, Projections (2015) presents itself (similarly to all of Madani’s paintings, animations, drawings and music) as a viscus and intuitive—quick or even hasty— figurative narrative depicting male figures participating in some sort of tragic comedy.  Carbon Black lines […]

Camille Claudel’s Les Causeuses: The Subject of Lack and the Leaning Tree of Destiny

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

Camille Claudel’s Les Causeuses: The Subject of Lack and the Leaning Tree of Destiny

Unfortunately, albeit perhaps tethered to imposed historical responsibility, most introductions to Camille Claudel and her oeuvre are steeped in biographical detail that inevitably draws  in her partner Rodin’s shadow. I am afraid that I, too, have lapsed into entertaining this impulse if only to make it an object of critique. Although “Rodin’s mistress,” “Rodin’s assistant” […]

On Chantal Akerman’s Biopolitical Rebellion

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

On Chantal Akerman’s Biopolitical Rebellion

The work of Belgian filmmaker Chantal Akerman has received no scarcity of praise. Akerman is considered one of the more influential feminist filmmakers to emerge from Europe in the 70s and her film Jeanne Dielman 23, quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles is particularly iconic. I’ve always found Akerman’s acclaim fascinating because she exists sort of […]

The Double Standard and The Drawing Room within Perrotin A Quick Examination of Genesis Belanger & Emily Mae Smith

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

The Double Standard and The Drawing Room within Perrotin A Quick Examination of Genesis Belanger & Emily Mae Smith

I’m going to discuss one image—with works from two female-identifying artists. The image is taken by an anonymous photographer that documented the two-person exhibition A Strange Relative at Perrotin New York in late 2018. The exhibition, a two-person dialogue between Brooklyn-based ceramicist Genesis Belanger and painter Emily Mae Smith is described by Perrotin as two […]

A Look Back

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

In the midst of a global pandemic, when the stream of constant news is at it loudest, it is the perfect opportunity for quiet reflection. I’m sure a great philosopher said that somewhere before, but the message is certainly loud and clear given recent events. As highlighted in last month’s column, “The New Fashion Industry”, […]

“The Exhibition of Persephone Q” by Jessi Jezeweska Stevens

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

“The Exhibition of Persephone Q”, by Jessi Jezeweska Stevens, is her debut novel and it is commandingly brilliant.  The dystopian novel has rather taken over in fiction, particularly fiction by millennials, an overmaligned generation whose voices are just beginning to fill our bookstores. While we’re used to reading fiction about the wandering, lost single white […]

“Simon The Fiddler” by Paulette Jiles

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

Paulette Jiles’ new novel, “Simon The Fiddler”, is both charming and a wonderful story; the writer offers us some fascinating history of the State of Texas right after the end of The Civil War, when the novel takes place.  It feels, in many ways, like a fairy tale, which is part of the wonder of […]

“The Mountains Sing” by Nguyen Han Que Mai

May 23rd, 2020  |  by  |  published in May 2020

“The Mountains Sing”, by Nguyen Han Que Mai, is the first novel I’ve ever read about a Vietnamese family and its vicissitudes over four generations of war, reeducation, landgrabbing by peasants from the middle classes, the French and American wars. For the record, the American war is basically just a piece of this book, almost […]