Archive for February, 2016

On the Verge: Daubigny, Monet, Van Gogh: Impressions of Landscape at Taft Museum of Art, February 20-May 29, 2016

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in *, February 2016

On the Verge:  Daubigny, Monet, Van Gogh: Impressions of Landscape at Taft Museum of Art, February 20-May 29, 2016

How newly-founded must an American art museum be not to be awash in paintings by the painters of the Barbizon School, either on display or, perhaps more likely these days, in storage? The works of Corot, Rousseau, Millet, Daubigny, and a number of artists loosely allied with them represent an important but frequently not fully […]

as if hauntingly, it isn’t my home, it’s just where I live: on Do Ho Suh at the CAC

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in *, February 2016

as if hauntingly, it isn’t my home, it’s just where I live: on Do Ho Suh at the CAC

“and none of these is wholly compassed by a certain pernicious understanding of reading as escape. Escape from what? The “real world,” ostensibly, the “responsibility” of “acting” or “performing” in that world. Yes this reading posture registers as extroversion at least as much as introversion, as public as it does private: all a reader need […]

Living Things: Jochen Lempert’s Field Guide

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in *, February 2016

Living Things: Jochen Lempert’s Field Guide

Because we are so exposed to and distracted by images in our lives, we become desensitized to one of photography’s chief purposes: to observe. Jochen Lempert’s photography, now on display at the Cincinnati Art Museum in Field Guide: Photographs by Jochen Lempert, presents a captivating retrospective of the artist and biologist’s art, and one that, […]

Matthew Kolodziej’s “Patch Work” at Carl Solway Gallery

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in *, February 2016

Matthew Kolodziej’s "Patch Work" at Carl Solway Gallery

In the early part of last century abstraction began considering something as simple as the power of multiple intersecting lines. The clarity of the grid evolved to become, in Rosalind Krauss’ words, “modern art’s will to silence, its hostility to literature, to narrative, to discourse.” Matthew Kolodziej’s paintings begin at this point in more ways […]

“52 Tuesdays”: A Survey of a year before the easel

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in *, February 2016

"52 Tuesdays": A Survey of a year before the easel

The works chosen for this landscape exhibit represent one artist’s efforts at the easel on a Tuesday, any given week of his sabbatical year. Kevin Muente’s successful descriptive representations are on the spot plein aire paintings which were not additionally edited in the studio. The paintings depict common landscape, not ostentatiously landmarked but painted closely, […]

Dana Michel and the Yellow Towel

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Black Hoodie. Back Turned. Hands reaching in pockets. That’s all Dana Michel did at the beginning of her performance piece. She didn’t sashay out, say a word, or turn around. Yet this simple combination seemed to symbolize more than just a casual introduction. It reminded me of the “Ferguson” painting by Titus Kaphur that graced […]

Nanook of the North

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

The Woodward Theater started as a movie house and this February it lit up again with the black and white flicker of Film. The cold light of ‘Nanook of the North’ seemed to produce an uncanny feeling of familiarity, as if this space remembered its calling as a silver screen instead of a punk rock […]

“Vestiges,” YWCA Women’s Art Gallery

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

“Vestiges,” YWCA Women’s Art Gallery

The thesis of “Vestiges” is set out on the announcement card: “. . . Brenda Tarbell, Cheryl Pannabecker, and Carrie Pate explore the natural world and relationships, bringing to the surface the unnoticed, hidden, or unexpressed.” There was something about the exhibition title that seemed off to me so I went to the dictionary. “Vestige” […]

Happy Limbo of Suspended Metaphors

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Happy Limbo of Suspended Metaphors

First Impressions Looking at a body of work is like looking at a person.  As the acquaintance (or viewer) you are given clues about the person but without context, you’re shown their present with no sense of the past, and it’s up to you to piece it all together into one sum of a human.  […]

Who are WE– The Jimi Jones Worldview

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Who are WE-- The Jimi Jones Worldview

Jimi Jones, ever the graphic designer, is in the billboard business as evidenced by his current show at the Springfield Museum of Art. Jones views his role as an artist who explores and celebrates the African American cultural production as well as being a storyteller in an historical context. His large oil and acrylic canvases […]

The Battle of Versailles

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

  November 1973, the Palace of Versailles. In what is now known as The Battle of Versailles, five American designers took on five French designers in a runway show originally organized to help raise funds for the iconic palace. Everyone was there, and truth be told, it was well assumed that French designers Marc Bohan […]

7m4 70y

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

7m4 70y

I have been involved in the arts as a collector/artist and model since I was five. For me Art of all sorts is a passion, one to be embraced and enjoyed. I was Co-Founder and Director of Katz and Dawgs the Gallery from 1986-1990. It was an experimental art gallery. And we mounted thirty-six shows […]

Profile of Frank Satogata

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Profile of Frank Satogata

Frank Satogata’s studio is deep in the Brazee Street complex of artists’ work spaces, down one hall and then another, up stairs and along another hall before a knock on a door brings this pleasant, smiling man to open it and a little flurry results as his companion Elle, a West Highland terrier, is equally […]

Kate Kern’s Floating World

February 24th, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Kate Kern’s Floating World

Kate Kern is a visual artist who works primarily in drawing, although her work ranges from making artist books to installations, as well as an occasional curatorial endeavor.  In 2013, she curated “Wounded Home” at the Lloyd Library and Museum, and was also a featured artist in the print collection Cincinnati Portfolio IV by Clay […]

Behringer-Crawford Museum Offers a View into Northern Kentucky’s Past

February 23rd, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Behringer-Crawford Museum Offers a View into Northern Kentucky’s Past

Where can you see a mastodon jawbone from 10,000 B.C. and a streetcar built in 1892 in one location? The Behringer-Crawford Museum in Covington, Kentucky offers 450 million years of Northern Kentucky history and culture viewed through the lens of transportation – rivers, roads, rails and runways.  Ongoing creative, innovative and family programs are also […]

When does a photograph become fine art?

February 23rd, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

When does a photograph become fine art?

There is no black-and-white answer to this question.  No a color answer, either. But perhaps this is a good starting point: A photograph always depicts a subject.  Most photography begins and stops with the idea of a “capture”:  the goal is to achieve a literal representation of the subject.  It doesn’t even have to be […]

Photo Essay – Catherine Aboumrad

February 23rd, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Photo Essay - Catherine Aboumrad

“Capturing Stillness” – artist statement The Great North of Canada is composed of an infinite and inaccessible number of desert spaces.  The smallness of Self within the infinitely great is a call to introspection. The serenity and silence of the place reveal a disturbing and giddy emptiness. Within this space, there is a presence called […]

The Clash of Nature and the Human Imprint in “Farewell, Eden”

February 23rd, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

The Clash of Nature and the Human Imprint in “Farewell, Eden”

During the 19th century, landscape painting was a popular form of expression for artists to celebrate mankind’s dominion over nature. Pastoral scenes of manicured lawns, tamed gardens and ripe harvests depicted a peaceful, almost perfect world where man and nature thrived in harmonious union. Currently on view at Descanso Garden’s Sturt Haaga Gallery, “Farewell, Eden” […]

“I should have brought a philosopher”: 3 from DiverseWorks’ “What Shall We Do Next?”

February 23rd, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

“I should have brought a philosopher”: 3 from DiverseWorks’ “What Shall We Do Next?”

1: “Refresh (zine)” by Kristin Lucas, 7 stacks of 8.5×11” sheets of paper, stapler. In 2007, Kristin Lucas began her ongoing “Refresh” series, in which she decides to legally change her name. But, it’s only a “refresh,” in the same way one would refresh a page on an internet browser: she was Kristin Sue Lucas, […]

Documentary Review: “Adam Driver Brings Monologues to the Military: Arts in the Armed Forces (AITAF)”

February 23rd, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Documentary Review: “Adam Driver Brings Monologues to the Military:  Arts in the Armed Forces (AITAF)”

December of 2015 Vice News (a rapidly emerging online media outlet for the “connected generation”) premiered an intriguing documentary entitled, “Adam Driver Brings Monologues to the Military: Arts in the Armed Forces”. Led by Marine-turned-actor Adam Driver (Girls, Star Wars: The Force Awakens), and his wife AITAF’s Artistic Director Joanne Tucker, we follow can’t-quite-place their […]

Maxwell’s Poetry Corner

February 23rd, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Vinaigrette     Disregarded drips collecting along the bottom rim of my mug, staining rings on Grump’s old desk, prove combined similarities can leave a mark.   My city, similar in thorough collectivity, patient in method, observant of other’s moves, reminds me that stained history is tough to disregard.   Those rings will not be […]

Samantha Hunt’s Mr. Splitfoot

February 23rd, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Upstate New York, beginning with Buffalo/Niagara Falls, and running through Rochester, Syracuse, due East to Utica, and then up Northeast to Troy and Schenectady, lost most of its industries in the early to mid 1960s, as mill towns lost their mills, and leather tanneries, one of the area’s major employees, closed when New York State […]

Joyce Carol Oates’ The Man Without a Shadow

February 23rd, 2016  |  by  |  published in February 2016

Acknowledging as a starting point that Joyce Carol Oates is never dull, never less than fascinating, and one of America’s greatest writers with one of the most fertile imaginations on earth, this maestra returns with her fascinating The Man Without a Shadow. As background, Oates was, in the past few years, widowed and remarried, and […]

February Issue of Aeqai Online

February 23rd, 2016  |  by  |  published in Announcements

February issue of Aeqai (go to www.aeqai.com) has just posted.  It reflects the very wide range of exhibitions currently on display throughout the region; we’ve got nearly 25 reviews and profiles this month, and it looks like next month’s going to be a big one, as well.  Highlights of this issue include Jonathan Kamholtz’s review of […]