Features

Directions in the Visual Arts: Thoughts at the End of the Season

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

by Daniel Brown As we near the end of another art season, which is generally thought to run from September through June, much like the academic year, some patterns have emerged which we should note.  The predominant movement seems to be towards a near complete domination of the visual arts by non-profits, and the very [...]

Creative Expression: Artists’ Works from the Loeb Collection

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

Creative Expression: Artists’ Works from the Loeb Collection

by Fran Watson from May 5 – August 24, 2014 A Book of Verses underneath the Bough, A Jug of Wine, A Loaf of Bread—and Thou Beside me singing in the Wilderness— Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow! Nothing could be more natural than the mix of art and books.  Both benefit, and the public is [...]

Beverly Erschell – Internationally Known Painter Located in Northern Kentucky

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

Beverly Erschell - Internationally Known Painter Located in Northern Kentucky

by Laura A. Hobson A visitor winds her way off interstate roads to reach artist Beverly Erschell’s home, tucked away in a house overlooking the Ohio River in Northern Kentucky.  There, Erschell, 79, paints in a home studio.  “All my paintings are discoveries,” she said.  “I paint to learn.”  Her preferred medium is oils, but [...]

Double Artist Residency Exhibit: Jeremy Plunkett and Nicholas Mancini at Manifest

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

Double Artist Residency Exhibit: Jeremy Plunkett and Nicholas Mancini at Manifest

by Marlene Steele The Manifest Artist in Residency Program has been expanded to include a double position this year.  The work of Jeremy Plunkett and Nicholas Anthony Mancini produced during this residency term is exhibited at the Woodburn avenue gallery. ” ‘Container’ speaks of both the act of containing and a vessel that…holds or transports [...]

DEEP IN THE HEART OF YOU-KNOW-WHERE: Letter from Texas

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

DEEP IN THE HEART OF YOU-KNOW-WHERE: Letter from Texas

by Judith Fairly Ah, Texas; is there any place that elicits such polarized opinion as the Lone Star state, regardless of whether one has actually set foot within its borders? Even my dad, whose Scottish forebears were in Texas for three generations before his parents left to start a school next door in New Mexico, [...]

Letter from the Mid-Atlantic

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

by Jane Durrell June 18, 2014 We are cutting through calm waters in a ship so large, so superbly engineered that only now and then does a tremor indicate we are at sea.  The Queen Mary II is majestic indeed, elegantly Art Deco in most respects and staffed by people so obliging they seem to [...]

Toward a Holistic Approach to Art and Design, or To Love a Soup Bowl

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

Toward a Holistic Approach to Art and Design, or To Love a Soup Bowl

by Matthew Metzger It’s difficult to talk about the unnecessary rift between art, design and craft without being somewhat didactic and hypocritical.  The “disciplines” need to be separated to some degree to begin a conversation about them in the first place. It’s ambiguous at best to later backpedal and claim that art, design and craft [...]

ART FOR A BETTER WORLD

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

ART FOR A BETTER WORLD

by Saad Ghosn I. Images For A Better World: Andrew AU, Visual Artist Andrew Au, a Cincinnati-based artist, was born in1972 in Chicago, IL; he grew up in Keyser, WV. Au has drawn ever since he was able to put pen to paper, influenced from an early age by science fiction, religion, reading and art. [...]

Clever Girl Book Review

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

by Daniel Brown Clever Girl, by English writer Tessa Hadley, establishes her in great tradition of English women writers whose symbolic ancestor remains Jane Austen.  I admit to being something of a sucker for family sagas, including The Forsythe Saga by John Galsworthy, and Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann.  Contemporary writers in this genre, which expands [...]

All The Light We Cannot See Book Review

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

by Daniel Brown Just as I had stated last month that Francine Prose’s novel The Chameleon Club is the best novel of 2014 to date, I read Anthony Doerr’s  All the Light We Cannot See, which I think it’s safe to call a masterpiece.  Written over a ten year period but just published, Doerr’s novel [...]

Art Moderne Clock Acquired by Art Museum

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

Art Moderne Clock Acquired by Art Museum

By David Smith The Cincinnati Art Museum recently announced the acquisition of a clock by Jean Puiforcat. The c. 1930 desk clock, made of nickel-plated brass and rosewood, is to be installed in the museum’s Gallery 211 by the end of June 2014. The design is a tour-de-force of late Art Deco/Art Moderne aesthetic and [...]

June Letter from the Editor

June 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, June 2014

The June issue of aeqai is now ready for your aesthetic pleasure and intellectual enjoyment.  We are just beginning that time of year when the pace of the arts and urban culture relaxes a little, so this is a smaller edition of aeqai. Two of the most important shows at area museums have just recently [...]

North by Northside

June 1st, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

North by Northside

by Christopher Hoeting After a five-year hiatus, the Alice F. and Harris K. Weston Art Gallery turned its compass to the northern side of Cincinnati to revive popular studio tour/art walk North By Northside. On May 18, 2014, event organizers Dennis Harrington and Kelly O’Donnell produced a rare opportunity to experience a comprehensive look at [...]

Postcard from DC “American Cool”

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

by Marlene Steele National Portrait Gallery  Feb. 7 – Sept 7 2014 This photography exhibition presents several decades of historic, artistic and contemporary images of American icons who embody the concept of “Cool”. What are the criteria of “coolness” for inclusion in this exhibition? ⁃     Original artistic vision with innovative signature style. ⁃         Represents cultural [...]

The Photo Archive of Louis Zoellar Bickett

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

The Photo Archive of Louis Zoellar Bickett

AARON SKOLNICK’S 20 PAIRS OF SHOES, MAY 5, 2014, The Archive of Louis Zoellar Bickett   SAM FOY IN THE ARCHIVE GARDEN, MAY 5, 2014, The Archive of Louis Zoellar Bickett                                      

Photos of Northside Studio Tour on May 18th

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

Photos of Northside Studio Tour on May 18th

by Jens Rosenkrantz    

Shawn Daniell: In Memorial

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

by Daniel Brown Shawn Daniell: In Memorial Shawn came to see me in 2010, when I had just taken over as Editor of aeqai.  She was shy but certain that she had an idea that would be good for aeqai and for her.  I remember her literally sitting on the edge of my couch, until [...]

Tribute to Shawn Daniell (Buckenmeyer), 1977-2014

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

Tribute to Shawn Daniell (Buckenmeyer), 1977-2014

by Robert K. Wallace (submitted for the May 2014 issue of AEQAI) I first met Shawn as a journalist. In February 2011 she covered a lecture by the French artist Claire Illouz for The Northerner, NKU’s student newspaper. Illouz visited our campus on the way back from the Codex Book Fair in Berkeley, California, where [...]

May Essay

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

by Daniel Brown The recent trip to New York by our symphony, The May Festival Chorus, The Cincinnati Opera, The Cincinnati Ballet, The Art Museum, The Taft Museum, The Ariel String Quartet from CCM, and seven area chefs represents a new opening wedge in branding and marketing Cincinnati nationally.  What at first appeared to be [...]

The Contemporary Arts Center Turns 75

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

by Daniel Brown Aeqai congratulates the CAC as it celebrates its 75 anniversary year.  We have decided to help the festivities by asking two people a month to let us know what the CAC has meant to them.  Aeqai will be asking former staff and board members, as well as artists who have shown there, [...]

Geometrically Ordered Design: The One Language

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

Geometrically Ordered Design: The One Language

by Dustin Pike In this article I will be dissecting the notion that letters and numbers have shared an integral relationship with each other since their very beginnings, which, in ancient Greek times, was called ‘Gematria’ or ‘Isopsophy’. The basic idea is that since numbers, and their inter-relationships, form the key to every science, it [...]

Build Your Own Bauhaus (Design and Quality by Ikea of Sweden)

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

Build Your Own Bauhaus (Design and Quality by Ikea of Sweden)

by Danelle Cheney Shortly after World War I in April 1919, Das Staatliche Bauhaus—The State Home for Building—opened under the leadership of 31-year old Walter Gropius. The new Bauhaus was a merger of two existing schools: the Weimar Arts and Crafts School and the Weimar Art Academy. This marriage of applied arts and fine arts [...]

BLDG: Who or What Are They?

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

BLDG: Who or What Are They?

by Kevin Ott Midway through my exploration of BLDG, the Covington based branding/art studio/creative think tank/gallery, Jay Becker said “It all starts with the art”. I was trying to grasp ahold of the many tentacles that BLDG seems to be, and this statement described the head of the octopus. When you walk into BLDG on [...]

Art for a Better World – May

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

Art for a Better World - May

by Saad Ghosn I. Images For A Better World: Nathan WEIKERT, Visual Artist Nathan Weikert was born and raised in Kettering, Ohio. He graduated from Miami University with a BS in art education (1998), a BFA in painting (1998), and a MA in art education (2002). In 2013 he had a solo exhibition at 1305 [...]

May Letter from the Editor

May 24th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, May 2014

by Daniel Brown The month of May has been full of art exhibitions, indoor and outdoor, and lots of benefit parties to raise money for them.  We are nearing the end of the official art year, in June, as the art season is more or less the same as the school year.  Aeqai will post [...]

The Burden of Violence

April 26th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, April 2014, Features

The Burden of Violence

by Regan Brown The Burden of Violence: Todd Pavlisko’s “Crown” at the Cincinnati Art Museum through June 15th. I. Shoot to Thrill. “At 7:45pm I was shot in the left arm by my friend. The bullet was a copper jacket  .22 long rifle. My friend was standing about 15 feet from me.” ―Chris Burden, “Shoot”, [...]

Reflections upon Millard Rogers

April 26th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, April 2014, Features

by Daniel Brown The recent death of Millard Rogers, Director Emeritus of The Cincinnati Art Museum, not only brings back some extremely fond memories for many of us who knew him well, but also reminds me that we are searching now for another director of the art museum.  I am hoping that we can remember [...]

Aeqai Mourns Lily Mulberry

April 26th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, April 2014, Features

by Daniel Brown We are deeply saddened to let our readers know of the untimely death of Lily Mulberry, who invented and ran a gallery in OTR called 1305 Main. That gallery showed some of the finest exhibitions, mainly of area talent, of any gallery in the region. Lily herself had a very fine eye [...]

Why Midcentury Modernism?

April 26th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, April 2014, Features

Why Midcentury Modernism?

by David G. Smith For years a particular painting, sculpture, a piece of jewelry or a piece of furniture was a badge amongst the cognoscenti-modernism was like a secret club. In conjunction with its exhibit, “From the Village to Vogue: The Modernist Jewelry of Art Smith” (Feb. 22, 2014 – May 18,2014), the Cincinnati Art [...]

The Definitive Contemporary Landscape Show

April 26th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, April 2014, Features

The Definitive Contemporary Landscape Show

by Mike Rutledge COVINGTON – Curator Daniel Brown assembled the exhibition called The Definitive Contemporary Landscape to robustly prove a point. “Somebody said to me not too long ago that he found landscapes boring,” Brown said. The art expert offered Brown this reason for his opinion: “Well, they’ve been doing them for 300 years.” Brown [...]

Lily Mulberry Retrospective

April 26th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, April 2014, Features

by Jane Durrell Lily Mulberry’s long and difficult battle with cancer ended this month. For almost a decade her 1305 Gallery has given authenticity and continuing interest to the vivacity of the upper Main Street art scene and she herself was always a pleasure to encounter. The loss to the art community is both professional [...]

Art in the Smokies

April 26th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, April 2014, Features

Art in the Smokies

by Fran Watson Gatlinburg, Tennessee once was a quiet little town sporting one motel with rooms overlooking a rushing mountain stream and one restaurant.  At least, it was on my first trip there.  Several years later, I revisited it to find a commercial nightmare had descended upon it , its main street, and side two-lane [...]

Art For A Better World – April

April 26th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, April 2014, Features, Poetry

Art For A Better World - April

by Saad Ghosn I. Images For A Better World: Ricci MICHAELS, Visual Artist Ricci Michaels was born and raised in Philadelphia, the seventh of eight daughters. Encouraged by her teachers, she started painting at a very young age, as far back as kindergarten. She liked to see her pictures hung often in her classroom. Being [...]

Letter from the Editor – April

April 26th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, April 2014, Features

I would like to thank everyone who came to, or helped with, the aeqai benefit party at Marta Hewett Gallery on April 17th.  The event was highly successful, and generated 125% more money than last year’s.  We also want to thank all the artists who were kind enough to donate their work for our silent [...]

Ain’t Misbehavin’

March 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, March 2014

Ain’t Misbehavin’

by Stephen Slaughter “Buildering, Misbehaving the City” and KniveandFork Questions and Answers Space and Place The Ordinary and the Banal The objective of architecture is works of art that are lived in.  The city is the largest, and at present the worst of such works of art. Functionalism (to speak roughly of the heroic period [...]

William Messer: Some Women, Some Stories

March 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, March 2014

William Messer: Some Women, Some Stories

by Kevin Ott Iris BookCafe and Gallery is an uncluttered but homey café/gallery on upper Main Street. Main between Central Parkway and Liberty has retained its DYI vibe, the bars, restaurants, cafes and retail still feeling a bit less polished than its more 3CDC-ish neighbor, Vine Street. Both are great, but Main Street and places [...]

What Do We Expect from Museum Directors?

March 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, March 2014

by Daniel Brown As the search for a new director of the Art Museum continues, we have been made aware that the museum board places high priority on the director being part of the international art scene, known internationally.  I wish that the board would be more specific in telling us why that is a [...]

Gutenberg vs. The Internet

March 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, March 2014

Gutenberg vs. The Internet

by Danelle Cheney 1455: Mainz, Germany. Johannes Gutenberg nears completion on the first edition of the forty-two line bible with moveable type and machinery he’s spent years developing. 1969: Los Angeles, USA. Charley S. Kline sends the first message across an early version of the internet: “LO.” He was attempting to type “LOGIN,” which he [...]

Art for a Better World – March

March 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, March 2014

Art for a Better World - March

by Saad Ghosn I.  Images For A Better World: Kimberly HENSON, Visual Artist Kymberly Henson has been working in the arts for over 30 years. After graduating with an art degree from Edgecliff College she owned and operated a wearable art studio called “Kymber Originals”, producing one of a kind and limited edition hand-painted and [...]

Louis Bickett Photo Essays – March

March 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, March 2014

Louis Bickett Photo Essays - March

from the Louis Bickett Photo Archive What I Read Collection     Daddy Collects Collection     I IMAGINE THE OLD NIGGER WILL BE CHEAPER’, VINTAGE LETTER, 17 FEBRUARY 2011  

Letter from Wyoming – There Is Good Art Everywhere

March 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, March 2014

Letter from Wyoming - There Is Good Art Everywhere

By Cynthia Kukla There is good art everywhere, just look.  Look a little harder and you will find great art just about anywhere.  Such is the case with the exhibition of Robert Motherwell and Lee Hall in Jackson Hole, Wyoming’s big ski country.  Great art indeed. Tayloe Piggott, owner and namesake of her gallery, presented/paired [...]

Letter from Roanoke – March

March 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, March 2014

Letter from Roanoke - March

By Judith Fairly The contrast between the gray people-moving facility I’d left in Dallas-Fort Worth and the airy concourse into which I disembarked at the Roanoke Regional Airport that the architect Ron Price envisioned as a “transition between earth and air” could not have been greater. Price’s design utilizes materials that look to both the [...]

Book Review: The Apartment

March 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, March 2014

by Daniel Brown The Apartment, a new novel by Greg Baxter, is a very compelling, beautifully crafted and written book wherein all the action takes place on one single day in an unnamed Eastern European capital, most likely but not necessarily, Prague.  The American narrator is a forty-one year old former Navy man with experience [...]

Comics: Art Imitates Art Which Imitates Art

February 23rd, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, February 2014

Comics: Art Imitates Art Which Imitates Art

by Danelle Cheney Comic books firmly straddle the space between visual art and literature. They are unique in format: the visuals are just as important to understanding the story as the words (unlike a traditional book, which may be republished several times with differing sets of illustrations). There are even some which include absolutely no [...]

Cincinnati Art Ambassador Fellowships – An Opportunity for Cincinnati’s Individual Artists

February 23rd, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, February 2014

Cincinnati Art Ambassador Fellowships - An Opportunity for Cincinnati’s Individual Artists

by Jan Brown Checco If you are a working artist living in Cincinnati, and you don’t have a salaried position within one of our prestigious arts institutions, you know how difficult it is to live from commission to commission, adjunct position to street fair, open studio sales evening to short-term project.  There are thousands of [...]

The Centrality of Art Within the Art Industry

February 23rd, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, February 2014

by Daniel Brown We are regularly informed that the arts have become big business; the investment potential of a work of art has become far more important in late capitalist culture than whether the art is any good, what it says, how it’s made, or whether it matters.  It may surprise people under 50 that [...]

Letter from Chicago

February 23rd, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, February 2014

Letter from Chicago

by Christopher Hoeting The College Art Association just wrapped up its annual meeting at the Westin Hotel (February 12-15th) inside Chicago’s Loop, just six blocks south from of The Art Institute of Chicago. The conference highlights the academies offering of artist talks, panel discussions, workshops, interviewing sessions, and a book fair among other things. Or [...]

Letter from Santa Fe

February 23rd, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, February 2014

by Jane Durrell The light!  The light!  No wonder artists, passing through, change their minds and never go away. The town is tucked in an upper layer of mountainous terrain, peaks rising on three sides and the fourth side open toward Albuquerque, sixty-some miles away. We had come for a winter week in Santa Fe, [...]

The Artist’s Life

February 23rd, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, February 2014

by Fran Watson Patterson Center was packed to the brim with the most difficult people in the city: artists.  Mostly lady artists. Each of whom knew in her heart of hearts that she was vastly underrated and pushing valiantly  to right this obvious wrong. I was one of these, as determined and convinced of my [...]

Maxwell’s Poetry Corner – Cardinal and Crow

February 23rd, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, February 2014

by Maxwell Redder I Two cardinals and a murder of crows distinctly chatting between neighboring branches; barren minus twisting auburn vines slunk like somnolent tails, and an occasional jostling squirrel. Snow swallows hooves as a deer herd leaps along my father’s fence.   II True, a fence is like an hourglass: flipped one way to [...]

Best Films of 2013

February 23rd, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, February 2014

by David Schloss It was a rather good year for films, to my pleasant surprise. I found myself making meta-value judgments to sort out all the contenders, so many of which had many serious merits. It was a pleasure. 1. American Hustle. Great serious screwball script that sustains its complicated logic throughout. Great ensemble cast, [...]

#PERFORMANCEART

February 22nd, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, February 2014

By Drew Klein Performance art is so “in” right now. Just ask Jay Z, or Lady Gaga, or Shia LaBeouf. Each of these figures of contemporary pop culture have recently dipped their toes (or jumped headfirst into a fiery lake of PR hell) into the world of performance art. Or, at least that’s what they [...]

Robert Kushner: Paintings 2010-2013 & The Four Seasons Commissioned in 1990 for Tower Place in Cincinnati

January 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, January 2014

Robert Kushner: Paintings 2010-2013 & The Four Seasons Commissioned in 1990 for Tower Place in Cincinnati

by Karen Chambers Before I get to Robert Kushner’s exhibition at the Solway Gallery, let’s take a look at the Pattern and Decoration (P&D) Movement1, which he helped found. Ben Johnson’s curatorial notes for the 2012 exhibition “ReFocus: Art of the 70’s: Pattern and Decoration” at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Jacksonville, FL, sums [...]

Ideas on Hiring Museum Directors

January 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, January 2014

Ideas on Hiring Museum Directors

by Daniel Brown Aaron Betsky’s imminent departure as Director of The Cincinnati Art Museum brings up questions, in my mind, that have less to do with the pros and cons of his directorship, than of the methods by which directors are hired here in the first place.  I believe that the processes have been flawed [...]

Letter from Chicago: Focus on Five Artists and a Nod to Leyster

January 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, January 2014

Letter from Chicago: Focus on Five Artists and a Nod to Leyster

by Cynthia Kukla               Twenty years ago, in 1993, the Frans Hals Museum mounted an exhibition of the dozen authentic oil paintings of the ‘lost’ Judith Leyster (1609-1660).  Banners throughout the city of Amsterdam proclaimed and celebrated this centennial of Leyster’s rediscovery.  Why was this significant?  Judith Leyster was [...]

Geometrically Ordered Design: The Lords of the Skies

January 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, January 2014

Geometrically Ordered Design: The Lords of the Skies

by Dustin Pike “The phenomenon of UFOs does exist, and it must be treated seriously.” –Mikhail Gorbachev There is an old parable devised by Plato in his Republic wherein the pre-enlightened man and woman are taught the ways of the world only through the play of shadows projected onto the walls of a cave. After [...]

Summerfair Awards Local Artists

January 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, January 2014

Summerfair Awards Local Artists

By Laura A. Hobson Over the last two decades, Summerfair has contributed more than $500,000 in awards and scholarships to individual artists as well as additional support to events and exhibitions, particularly small arts institutions. “Word is starting to spread about what we are doing,” says Sharon K. Strubbe, executive director since 2006.  “We are [...]

Postmodern Publication Design

January 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, January 2014

Postmodern Publication Design

by Danelle Cheney Graphic designers are taught to confront and reconcile the relationship between form and content. Is one more important than the other, or equally so? Does personal expression, emotion, and humanity have a place in design, or should designers focus on legibility, clarity, and unity of content? The first Bauhaus manifesto states: “Together, [...]

Maxwell Redder – January Poetry

January 25th, 2014  |  by  |  published in *, Features, January 2014

by Maxwell Redder Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Crumpled Paper -Inspired by Wallace Stevens: Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird I. Crumpled and torn the paper’s fluidity, like a loincloth draped against breasts, stiffened, becoming  jagged, rigid, recyclable. II. Performing gymnastics, a piece of plain white dropped from a vibrantly checkered hot-air balloon [...]

Profile of Walt Burton

September 15th, 2012  |  by  |  published in *, Features, September 2012

Profile of Walt Burton

It’s probably inaccurate to call Walt Burton a gadfly, even though a run-down of his career might suggest that. He’s been a photographer, a dealer in historic photographs, a teacher, a guest lecturer, produced books (two of them autobiographical) and now, after two strokes and a heart attack,  is making startling prints based on collages [...]

Geometrically Ordered Design: The High Five

September 15th, 2012  |  by  |  published in Features, September 2012

Geometrically Ordered Design: The High Five

“It is only necessary to make war with five things; with the maladies of the body, the ignorances of the mind, with the passions of the body, with the seditions of the city and the discords of families.” -Pythagoras This article is my fifth article pertaining to the design field. Design in essence cannot be [...]

Geometrically Ordered Design: Two to Tango

May 17th, 2012  |  by  |  published in Features, May 2012

Geometrically Ordered Design: Two to Tango

“So God created man in his own image.” -Genesis 1:27 This is technically my second article pertaining to the design field and again it is necessary to distinguish between art and design. Design in essence cannot be accomplished without specific degrees of control, and almost always has a definitive point to make. How well the [...]

VAGA: Protecting the rights of artists since 1976

May 17th, 2012  |  by  |  published in Features, May 2012

As an artist and a person in the media, images play an important role in my professional and personal life. The idea of ownership and rights is a key element when talking about the use of images in the media. For instance, did you know that just because you may own a work of art, [...]

Letter From Los Angeles

April 14th, 2012  |  by  |  published in April 2012, Features

Letter From Los Angeles

Our Debt to the West Coast: Pacific Standard Time: 1945-1980 “An unprecedented collaboration of more than 60 cultural institutions across Southern California coming together to celebrate the birth of the L.A. art scene.”1 Visiting L.A. is like a review of your whole life. Driving around greater L.A. in traffic much less crazy than my hometown [...]

Kit Carson and Buffalo Bill capture the Kaiser

April 14th, 2012  |  by  |  published in April 2012, Features

Kit Carson and Buffalo Bill capture the Kaiser

Ten years ago when I was teaching Intro to Painting at the Art Academy of Cincinnati, I was cutting through the galleries on the second floor of the Art Museum when “The Unwelcome Guests” by Henry Farny suddenly caught my eye for the first time. There was a luminosity in that yellow sky that jumped [...]

Geometrically Ordered Design: The Loneliest One

April 14th, 2012  |  by  |  published in April 2012, Features

Geometrically Ordered Design: The Loneliest One

  “You cannot conceive the many without the one.” -Plato Since this is my first article pertaining to the design field, it may aide the reader to know how to distinguish art from design.  Design in essence cannot be accomplished without specific degrees of control, and almost always has a definitive point to make. How [...]

Alibis By André Aciman

April 14th, 2012  |  by  |  published in April 2012, Features

André Aciman was born into an upper middle class-to-rich Jewish family in Alexandria, Egypt.  He has described the nearly Chekovian life that his extended family lived in the waning days of a tolerant and multicultural Egypt.  As anti-Semitism rose in Egypt, a manipulative political movement meant to target “outsiders” and “foreigners”, various members of the [...]

New Baroque, a New BLOG

April 14th, 2012  |  by  |  published in April 2012, Features

New Baroque, a New BLOG

New Baroque is a blog featuring young artists from Kentucky, Los Angeles, and New York.  It came about when I noticed that a group of artists working in the New Baroque style were not getting the attention that I thought they deserved.   The art of the Baroque was stylistically complex with a tendency to exaggerate [...]

Geometrically Ordered Design: Design Intervention

March 18th, 2012  |  by  |  published in Features, March 2012

Geometrically Ordered Design:  Design Intervention

This article marks the first of many articles to come in reference to the field of design. These articles will attempt to analyze and interpret the meanings of a vast number of subjects surrounding the design field, and enlighten the reader of their importance. However, before I get into my first subject on design I [...]

James Priest, Head Gardner at Giverny

March 18th, 2012  |  by  |  published in Features, March 2012

I would like to express my thanks to my husband, Richard Hoskin, who took time off from writing his novel, as I lay feverish from the flu at home, to meet with James Priest and ask questions I had prepared and some of his own. The Gardens at Giverny, home of Claude Monet from 1883 [...]

Letter From London

February 18th, 2012  |  by  |  published in *, Features, February 2012

Letter From London

In London, on the day I went to both exhibitions, it seemed that everyone who wasn’t at the National Gallery’s stunning Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan had come to the Royal Academy for David Hockney’s knock-your-eye-out responses to the English landscape. Each show was at controlled maximum attendance but the crowds [...]

Letter from New York: Hidden Gems

January 23rd, 2012  |  by  |  published in *, Features, January 2012

Letter from New York: Hidden Gems

This is the second in a series of a quarterly letters, which will cover painting shows in greater New York. “From the top of the arched opening – as it gradually widens – pours forth a sparkling flow of jewels, a pattering rain of diamonds, and, directly following, a tumble of gems of every color, [...]

Best Fiction of 2011

January 23rd, 2012  |  by  |  published in Features, January 2012

The year 2011 in new fiction began as bleakly as any in recent memory.  By the end of summer, only two or three novels seemed even to be somewhat good – and we need to watch literary/politically correct trends, to make certain we’re not simply reading what’s been declared good for us/for the victimized but [...]

Cole Carothers

December 15th, 2011  |  by  |  published in December 2011, Features, On View

Cole Carothers

As an artist ages, he or she becomes increasingly sensitive to the world and more uncertain of how to proceed. As the artist grows wiser, he or she must make the decision to continue groping for the elusive threads of memory and the constant uncertainty of personal experience. It is important for the work that [...]

A Local Culture: tradition and risk in Cincinnati

November 15th, 2011  |  by  |  published in *, Features, November 2011

A Local Culture: tradition and risk in Cincinnati

daydreaming of success of enhancing culture, of collaboration bringing this city up with all of our brilliance bringing this city to life with all of our passion filling this city up with our art, with our sounds with our faces and ideas … Excerpted from “Rubble of The Mind” by Jim Swill, Caustic Nostalgia: selected [...]

Letter from New York: Maps and Legends

October 15th, 2011  |  by  |  published in *, Features, October 2011

Letter from New York: Maps and Legends

This is the first in a series of a quarterly letters, which will cover painting shows in greater New York If you want to experience the New York art scene from afar, watch James Kalm’s videos. Kalm tirelessly travels the city documenting art openings and exhibitions from Manhattan to Brooklyn.  His videos are a selective, [...]

Art: A Conversation of Souls

September 15th, 2011  |  by  |  published in Features, September 2011

Art: A Conversation of Souls

Art, at its best, is an asynchronous dialogue between the soul of the artist and the soul of the viewer. It is a conversation of the soul, because what moves the artist to create and the viewer to respond comes from a deeper level than the mind. No amount of technical expertise can move the [...]

International Artists Exchanges, a la mode “Sister Cities”

September 15th, 2011  |  by  |  published in Features, September 2011

International Artists Exchanges, a la mode “Sister Cities”

It’s satisfying to identify the first seeds of what we become, and to what we commit.  The mentor who sowed my life into a fertile ground of art and travel is clear:  Uncle Bob gave me my first art history book in 1962 upon return from one of his many international adventures.  A Renaissance man, [...]

TATE X SPINE TV: VISUAL DIALOGUES PART 3

July 30th, 2011  |  by  |  published in Features, Multimedia, Summer 2011

For A Better World: SOS Art

June 15th, 2011  |  by  |  published in Features, June 2011

For A Better World: SOS Art

Saad Ghosn Mobilizes Hundreds of Artists Yet Again Lady Liberty returns. Not the Neoclassical colossus on Liberty Island. It is the shrieking girl with the liberty spikes on the S.O.S. ART posters plastered all over downtown. S.O.S. ART is a rally cry for peace and justice, which began in March of 2003 just as the [...]

“Outsiderness”

May 15th, 2011  |  by  |  published in Features

“Outsiderness”

                        Outside of “Outsiderness” Thornton Dial, Courttney Cooper, and other “Hard Truths” In an essay in the catalog for “Hard Truths,” Thornton Dial’s brilliant retrospective at the Indianapolis Museum of Art (up until September 15, 2011), Greg Tate takes on the “hard truths” involved [...]

Things Fall Apart

April 18th, 2011  |  by  |  published in Features

Things Fall Apart

Nam June Paik and the Conservation of Video Sculpture A Symposium at DAAP Conserving the pioneering work of artist Nam June Paik was the subject of this past weekend’s symposium at The University of Cincinnati. Made possible by a grant from the Getty Foundation, artists, curators, and academics from across the nation and as far [...]

What Would Nam June (Paik) Do?

April 18th, 2011  |  by  |  published in Features, On View

 What Would Nam June (Paik) Do?

What Would Nam June (Paik) Do? The University of Cincinnati’s College of Design Art Architecture and Planning hosted the Nam June Paik and the Conservation of Video Sculpture, Symposium and Exhibition (April 15-16, 2011), a coup for the College of Art, (long the red-headed stepchild of DAAP’s other more financially-driven Colleges). Thanks to a grant [...]

Into The Night

March 15th, 2011  |  by  |  published in Features

Into The Night

Off the Wall, Into the Night The environmental context is often an afterthought when we view art, although the surroundings set the stage for the work. Everything from the size of the room and the lighting, to the formality or casualness of the venue affects our perceptions. The default installation setting of white gallery walls, [...]

Great Expectations

February 15th, 2011  |  by  |  published in Digest, Features

Great Expectations

Cincinnati Against the World On a Wednesday evening, in a room above the raucous crowd assembled for Mayday Bar in Northside’s Bingo night, five artists of various ilk (visual artists Britni Bicknaver & Paul Coors, photographer-designer-street artist Floyd Johnson, designer-entrepreneur Rosie Kovacs, and poet Dana Ward) gathered to discuss an issue that has effected them [...]

Shifting Beneath Our Feet

January 15th, 2011  |  by  |  published in Features

Shifting Beneath Our Feet

A Theory of Context and the Failure of the Ready-made. The ready-made is so entrenched in contemporary practice that its status is canonical.  So much of today’s  -and yesterday’s- conceptually driven work would be unimaginable without it, and yet by redefining art making for the past half-century or more, the ready-made has become emblematic of [...]

Benedict Leca

December 15th, 2010  |  by  |  published in Features, Profiles

Benedict Leca

Curating to Delight and Inform “Hello, my name is Benedict Leca, and I am the curator of this show. Would you like me to give you a tour?” Leca visits the gallery that houses the Cincinnati Art Museum’s internationally acclaimed show Thomas Gainsborough and the Modern Woman (through January 2, 2011) two or three times [...]

Studio Glass

November 15th, 2010  |  by  |  published in Digest, Features

Studio Glass

A Look Back Although Cincinnati can’t truly be considered a hot bed of glass art activity, another Ohio city—Toledo—played a seminal role in the development of what is known as the Studio Glass Movement. Studio glass describes glasswork created by an artist working directly with the material, often alone, and with the intent of making [...]

James Crump

October 15th, 2010  |  by  |  published in Features, Profiles

James Crump

Reflections from a Discerning Eye In the film “Wall Street,” Michael Douglas misguidedly observed “greed is good” with dire results. However, if greed also means grasping every opportunity to create a world-class photography collection at the Cincinnati Art Museum James Crump is committing no aesthetic trespass. “I was asked to kick start a relatively dormant [...]